TEotWaWKI Movie Review: Shaun of the Dead

Shaun of the Dead

Shaun of the Dead

Directed by Edgar White

I’ll be straight up with you: I hate zombie comedies. It’s not just because they’re overwhelmingly stupid, but they have no redeeming value. They’re usually just a vehicle for idiot frat-boys doing things to unrealistically portrayed undead. In fact, I’d be willing to bet that today’s teen-age male population would be wiped out should we have another widespread outbreak given that they probably believe everything they see in those movies.

Let me be clear: Shaun of the Dead is NOT one of those movies!

Yes, it is a comedy. It is hysterical on many levels, not the least of which is the realistic portrayal of how folks typically reacted to the fact that their world is overrun with the undead. But don’t let the hilarity fool you. Beneath it lies good advice and excellent examples of how to act (or not) in a catastrophe. Allow me to use the format described in The Unthinkable to describe the movie.

Denial: I’m not talking about those who were thrown into a mental shut down by their inability to cope with the concept of the walking dead, though this was a majority of the deniers and, indeed, several characters in the movie. I’m thinking of people like myself who went on blithely with their lives despite what was happening. Is my behavior any different than Shaun’s? He stumbled to the store in a hungover stupor, while I boarded a plane to New York for business. Both of us could have seen the news or even the stumbling corpses in our streets, but didn’t connect the dots. It’s not really denial, but rather blindness on our parts. Good thing it didn’t kill us.

Deliberation: It sounds so simple, let’s make a plan and execute it! As the movie shows, it rarely worked out that way. What are your objectives? How best can you achieve them? It’s one thing if you’re acting alone (which I was in many cases), but the complexity increases geometrically with the size of your group. This is how groups fall apart AND coalesce. I liked how, in the movie, various groups kept encountering each other, exchanging information. Since the period covered in the film was just the first few days of the outbreak, people were inclined to help each other. It would have been interesting to see how the interactions would have turned out if their crisis lasted longer. They may not have been so friendly.

The Decisive Act: What this movie clearly demonstrates is that you cannot judge how someone might behave in a crisis based on their everyday, pre-SHTF behavior. Let’s face it, Shaun was a loser. However, when it came to it, he stepped up. I’d’ve been proud to number him in my group.

I just offed my mum, don’t ask me to do my friend.

There’s only so much one can take. Shaun proved more able than most, but he still had his limits. That just proves he retained his humanity.

This is an entertaining movie worth watching purely for it’s artistic merit. The fact that it ably demonstrates how a good group should act is just icing on the cake.

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~ by Bill Drinkmore on January 24, 2010.

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